Pigments in berries may help in cancer treatment

Researchers have revealed through a study published in journal Scientific Reports that pigments in berries could help regulate a key enzyme in cancer cells. This possibility could pave way for new avenues to treat the deadly disease. Scientists explain that sirtuins are enzymes regulating the expression of genes that control the function of cells through key cellular signalling pathways. Ageing causes changes in sirtuin function, and these changes contribute to the development of various diseases. Sirtuin 6, or SIRT6 for short, is a less well-known enzyme that is also linked to glucose metabolism. Berries get their red, blue or purple colour from …

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A new class of drugs could help treat resistant cancer

We may soon have a new class of drugs that could help us in our fight against resistant cancer, a new study has revealed. While the drug will not enter production phase for quite a few years, scientists are optimistic that if clinical trials are successful, the drug will help us tackle a variety of treatment-resistant cancers. Patients with breast cancer for example frequently become resistant to existing hormone-based treatments, leading to the disease becoming fatal. Early lab-based tests of ICEC0942 were successful in targeting resistant breast cancers and indicated minimal side effects, according to the results published in the journal …

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Type 2 diabetes patients who have breakfast later in the day could have higher BMI

Scientists have established an association between type 2 diabetes patients having lunch later in the day and their risk of having a higher BMI. Researchers published their findings in the journal Diabetic Medicine, wherein they have tried to explore a link between having breakfast later in the day and increase in BMI and if so, what specific factors about evening preference contributed to the increased risk. They recruited 210 non-shift workers living in Thailand with Type 2 diabetes for their study. Morning/evening preference was assessed using a questionnaire that focused on preferred time for waking up and going to bed; time of …

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Autism rate in US increases by 15%, CDC says

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has revealed in its latest report that there is a 15 per cent increase in prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among 11 surveillance sites from the most recent report two years ago. The report also points out that the prevalence of ASD is the highest since the CDC began tracking ASD in 2000. ASD is a developmental disorder characterized by social and communication impairments, combined with limited interests and repetitive behaviors. Early diagnosis and intervention are key to improving learning and skills. Rates have been rising since the 1960s, but researchers …

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Tool capable of identifying Zika-infected mosquitoes developed

A new tool capable of identifying Zika-infected mosquitoes has been developed by scientists at University of Queensland in Australia. The study published in the journal Science Advances found Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) was 18-times faster and 110-times cheaper than the current detection method. The new tool can effectively identify and target mosquitoes infected with Zika virus, potentially helping health authorities save lives. “We can quickly identify mosquitoes that are infected with Zika virus so public health authorities can treat affected areas before disease spreads to humans,” said Maggy Sikulu-Lord from University of Queensland in Australia. “This is definitely going to be a game-changer in disease …

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Smoking said to be potentially injurious to your leg muscles

Researchers have shown through a new study that smoking could directly damage the muscles by reducing the number of blood vessels in leg muscles, which in turn reduce the amount of oxygen and nutrients the muscles received. Using a mouse model, a team of researchers from California along with Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and Kochi University in Japan, exposed the mice to smoke from tobacco cigarettes for eight weeks, either by inhalation or by injecting them with a solution bubbled with smoke. The results, published in The Journal of Physiology, also showed that the reduced level of …

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Study finds what causes depression among diabetes patients

Scientists have found what causes depression among diabetes patients with their study indicating that increased levels of a protein inflammation in the body may be the reason behind depression among type-1 diabetes patients. It is well established that people with both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing depression, but the causes remain poorly understood. The research showed that higher levels of galectin-3 – an inflammatory protein – is the culprit. Galectin-3 is a key protein involved in promoting inflammatory immune system responses that are needed to repair tissue damage throughout the body, in response to injury or …

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Vitamin D rich diet said to lower cholesterol in kids

Scientists have established through a study a possible link between consumption of vitamin D rich diet and lowering of cholesterol levels in children. According to researchers at University of Eastern Finland vitamin D rich diet also have beneficial impact on other risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. For the study researchers analyzed data from nearly 500 children aged between six and eight years. Children with vitamin D level of more than 80 nmol/l (nanomoles per litre) had lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol levels than those whose vitamin levels were below 50 nmol/l, which is often regarded as a threshold value …

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Volunteer work could help reduce loneliness in widowed older adults

Researchers have published a study in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences wherein they have revealed that just two hours of volunteer work a week could help reduce loneliness in widowed older adults. In the study researchers examined whether becoming a volunteer at the time of widowhood is associated with reducing the risks of loneliness, which is a significant public health concern, particularly for those who have lost a spouse, linked to poorer physical health, depression and even earlier mortality. For the study researchers analyzed data from 5,882 married adults, ages 51 and older, who completed the …

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